Eructate and Flatulate

Yesterday, when I learned the word defalcate, it reminded me of two other similar sounding words — eructate and flatulate. (However, defalcate is in no way close to the other words in definition!!!) If you have any pre-adolescent boys (and even adolescent ones!) these two other words could be great to have in your vocabulary.

Eructate (i-ruhk-teyt) is a verb that means to belch. Eructate doesn’t refer to a dainty, quiet, burping. Eructating is louder, more forceful. Boys tend to have belching contests. They tend to think it’s cool to belch. On the other hand, mothers tend to want their children to have good manners and belching doesn’t play into having good manners!

We have a saying at our house: You can eructate when you hear the lady of the house eructate. Which means, since the lady of the home (me, the mother) doesn’t particularly like belching and would prefer my children to have good manners, I don’t belch. (Rarely . . . ) So, by saying this, my sons refrain from belching (especially at the dinner table). But they are not extremely upset. Because there is always the slim chance that Mom just might belch. Maybe . . . And if she does, then they can let loose with their own belches! The word eructate is a more genteel word than belching, so if you use the word enough, your children might start saying it, too. And that would add dignity to your sons’ conversation when talking about eructating with their buddies.

The second word that sounds similar to defalcate and eructate is flatulate. Flatulate (fla-choo-leyt) is a verb that means to pass gas. Using the word flatulate is more proper and politely acceptable than using other slang words for this bodily function.

So these two words are good to incorporate into your vocabulary — and for your children (especially the male ones!). It’s one way for your sons to impress their friends with their large vocabulary while still talking about these bodily functions.

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